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Encourage the CVI child to look at an object and not just play with it?

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4 months 1 week ago #38 by Super User
Super User created the topic: Encourage the CVI child to look at an object and not just play with it?
I work with children with CVI and I'm wondering how to use Active Learning when I'm trying to encourage the child to look at an object and not just play with it.

Iris Maxwell
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4 months 1 week ago #39 by Super User
Super User replied the topic: Encourage the CVI child to look at an object and not just play with it?
Sara Kitchen Responded:

"Hi Iris! I am of the mind that Active Learning is more about tactile and auditory play, which is just as important as looking, especially at the sensory motor level. I would perhaps only modify by putting things close to the face that have intriguing visual characteristic, like a favorite color or something shiny, just so the child may be more likely to notice the visual response to his own actions, but I wouldn't modify active learning for CVI. I might practice looking during other activities. There is an active learning-like environment for practicing looking called a CVI Den. See strategytosee.com/diy-projects/cvi-den/ for how to make one. It is an extremely modified environment where visual information really pops out, and can be combined with tactile information if the child touches the objects, but it is not rich enough in objects for me to consider it an active learning environment."
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4 months 1 week ago #40 by Super User
Super User replied the topic: Encourage the CVI child to look at an object and not just play with it?
Patty Obrzut Responded:

"Hi Iris,
It is important to remember that children with disabilities need to use all of their senses to explore their environment. We of course want to encourage development in all areas, but a child may need to start on their strengths to build new skills.

If you use materials that include all the senses you will be fostering development in all areas. If a child likes tactile items - you can find tactile items that are reflective, or that light up, or that have contrasting colors, etc. A child may be attracted to the tactile quality - but at the same time you are encouraging use of vision.

Children at lower level of development have difficult performing two or more tasks at one time. So they may not be able to touch and look, or move and feel, or hear and move at the same time. They need time to integrate the knowledge they are introduced to first. They take pauses in their activity and may briefly switch between one type of input to another. Give the child the time.

Remember this quote "Play is often overlooked as the key that helps unlock the door to learning." Mary Reilly. A child that is playing is a child that is learning. Use play to introduce new skills. A child who is visually impaired may listen to a neon yellow golf ball as it rolls over a wood play tray (auditory), then may reach out and touch the ball to find out what is making the noise (tactile) and may eventually look at (vision) the ball to track it as it moves. If the child's strength was hearing and touch - we use those skill to gain the child's attention, with the hope that vision skills will also be encouraged."
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